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Sebastian Turner
Sebastian Turner

Buy A Company


  • Often, a business combination like an acquisition or merger can be categorized in one of four ways:Vertical: the parent company acquires a company that is somewhere along its supply chain, either upstream (such as a vendor/supplier) or downstream (a processor or retailer).Horizontal: the parent company buys a competitor or other firm in their own industry sector, and at the same point in the supply chain.Conglomerate: the parent company buys a company in a different industry or sector entirely, in a peripheral or unrelated business.Congeneric: also known as a market expansion, this occurs when the parent buys a firm that is in the same or a closely-related industry, but which has different business lines or products."}},"@type": "Question","name": "What Is the Purpose of an Acqusition?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "Acquiring other companies can serve many purposes for the parent company. First, it can allow the company to expand its product lines or offerings. Second, it can cut down costs by acquiring businesses that feed into its supply chain. It can also acquire competitors in order to maintain market share and reduce competition.","@type": "Question","name": "What Is the Difference Between a Merger and an Acquisition?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "The main difference is that in an acquisition, the parent company fully takes over the target company and integrates it into the parent entity. In a merger, the two companies combine, but create a brand new entity (e.g., a new company name and identity that combines aspects of both)."]}]}] Investing Stocks

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buy a company



Acquiring other companies can serve many purposes for the parent company. First, it can allow the company to expand its product lines or offerings. Second, it can cut down costs by acquiring businesses that feed into its supply chain. It can also acquire competitors in order to maintain market share and reduce competition.


The main difference is that in an acquisition, the parent company fully takes over the target company and integrates it into the parent entity. In a merger, the two companies combine, but create a brand new entity (e.g., a new company name and identity that combines aspects of both).


The vote comes as Musk seeks to scrap the deal, casting doubt on Twitter's self-reported percentage of fake accounts and alleging the company was not as forthcoming as it should have been with its explanation of the calculation. Twitter has stood by its figure of less than 5% of monetizable daily active users being spam or fake and has said it's provided Musk plenty of information meeting the requirements of the deal.


The judge in the case recently allowed Musk's camp to revise his counterclaim against Twitter to include allegations made by a former Twitter security chief who recently filed a whistleblower complaint claiming egregious securities failings by the company. The whistleblower, Peiter "Mudge" Zatko, testified before a Senate panel earlier on Tuesday.


From building on strong leadership to offering incentives that encourage top performance, 6 key steps can help ensure your employees are aligning with company goals. Following are ways to promote buy-in and goal achievement.


When most people think of starting a business, they think of beginning from scratch--developing your own ideas and building the company from the ground up. But starting from scratch presents some distinct disadvantages, including the difficulty of building a customer base, marketing the new business, hiring employees and establishing cash flow...all without a track record or reputation to go on.


Whether you use a broker or go it alone, you will definitely want to put together an "acquisition team"--your banker, accountant and attorney--to help you. These advisors are essential to what is called "due diligence", which means reviewing and verifying all the relevant information about the business you are considering. When due diligence is done, you will know just what you are buying and from whom. The preliminary analysis starts with some basic questions. Why is this business for sale? What is the general perception of the industry and the particular business, and what is the outlook for the future? Does--or can--the business control enough market share to stay profitable? Are raw materials needed in abundant supply? How have the company's product or service lines changed over time?


You also need to assess the company's reputation and the strength of its business relationships. Talk to existing customers, suppliers and vendors about their relationships with the business. Contact the Better Business Bureau, industry associations and licensing and credit-reporting agencies to make sure there are no complaints against the business.


To get an idea of the company's anticipated returns and future financial needs, ask the business owner and/or accountants to show you projected financial statements. Balance sheets, income statements, cash flow statements, footnotes and tax returns for the past three years are all key indicators of a business's health. These documents will help you conduct a financial analysis that will spotlight any underlying problems and also provide a closer look at a wide range of less tangible information.


5. Tax returns for the past five years. Many small business owners make use of the business for personal needs. They may buy products they personally use and charge them to the business or take vacations using company funds, go to trade shows with their spouses, etc. You have to use your analytical skills and those of your accountant, to determine what the actual financial net worth of the company is.


10. All accounts payable. Like accounts receivable, accounts payable should be broken down by 30 days, 60 days, and 90 days. This is important in determining how well cash flows through the company. On payables more than 90 days old, you should check to see if any creditors have placed a lien on the company's assets.


14. Marketing strategies. How does the owner obtain customers? Does he or she offer discounts, advertise aggressively, or conduct public-relations campaigns? You should get copies of all sales literature to see the kind of image that is being projected by the business. When you look at the literature, pretend that you are a customer being solicited by the company. How does it make you feel? This can give you some idea of how the company is perceived by its market.


20. Seller-customer ties. You must find out if any customers are related or have any special ties to the present owner of the business. How long has any such account been with the company? What percentage of the company's business is accounted for by this particular customer or set of customers? Will this customer continue to purchase from the company if the ownership changes? 041b061a72


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